Making Immigration Happen
Chicago Woman Arrested for Selling Fraudulent Identity Documents to Illegal Aliens
A woman was arrested Wednesday, February 13, 2013, on charges she allegedly sold fraudulent identity documents to illegal aliens. These charges resulted from an investigation conducted by U.S. Immigra

Tag Archives: NYPD

Former Army Translator Re-Sentenced for Immigration Fraud

A U.S. Army contract translator was re-sentenced Wednesday, August 2, 2012, for illegally possessing national defense documents, and using a false identity to procure his U.S. citizenship and gain access to classified military materials. This is the result of an investigation by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), FBI and the New York City Police Department, with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Defense.

On May 19, 2008, the defendant was originally sentenced to 121 months in prison. That sentence was later reversed on appeal due to an error in the calculation of the advisory U.S. sentencing guidelines range. The case was then remanded for resentencing, and the judge in the case then imposed an above-guidelines sentence.

On Feb. 14, 2007, the defendant, whose true identity is still unknown and who goes by various names, including Abdulhakeem Nour, Abu Hakim, Noureddine Malki, Almaliki Nour, and Almalik Nour Eddin, pleaded guilty to the unauthorized possession of classified documents. On Dec. 20, 2005, the defendant pleaded guilty to the false identity charge.

In August 2003, the defendant used a false identity to apply for and gain a position as an Arabic translator for L-3 Titan Corporation, a company which provides translation services in Iraq for U.S. military personnel. He then used the same false identity to fraudulently obtain Secret and then Top Secret security clearances.

Subsequently, during assignments in Iraq, the defendant took classified documents from the U.S. Army without authorization. While assigned to an intelligence group in the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army at Al Taqqadam Air Base, he downloaded a classified electronic document and took hard copies of several other classified documents. The documents detailed the 82nd Airborne’s mission in Iraq in regard to insurgent activity, such as coordinates of insurgent locations, upon which the U.S. Army was preparing to fire in January 2004, and U.S. Army plans for protecting Sunni Iraqis traveling on their pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, in late January 2004.

During a later deployment to a U.S. Army base near Najaf, Iraq, the defendant obtained a photograph of a classified battle map identifying U.S. troop routes used in August 2004 during the battle of Najaf, where the U.S. and Iraqi security forces sustained serious casualties. In September 2005, the FBI-led Joint Terrorism Task Force recovered these classified documents during a search of the defendant’s Brooklyn apartment. One of the documents remains classified and therefore is not described here. In connection with the re-sentencing, the court found that the defendant had intentionally taken the classified materials that were later found in his possession.

The prosecution of this case is being handled by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York.

Jamaican National Arrested for Illegal Immigration, Drug Trafficking

Dean Myrie, aka Journey, 39, a Jamaican national, was arrested July 3, 2012, by the New York Police Department (NYPD)/U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) Task Force, after the U.S. Marshals Service received a tip from someone who saw a June 29 episode of “America’s Most Wanted” featuring Myrie. Dean Myrie, who was in the United States illegally, was residing in an apartment in New York City. The investigation was led by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) with the Baltimore County Police Department and Anne Arundel County Police.

“I want to thank “America’s Most Wanted” and our law enforcement partners in New York for their assistance in apprehending this fugitive who is alleged to be a part of a marijuana distribution organization involved in violent crime that spans four states and Jamaica,” said William Winter, special agent in charge for HSI Baltimore. “This Homeland Security Investigations-led investigation was greatly enhanced by the assistance and the expertise of the Baltimore County Police Department’s Homicide Division who uncovered and solved the murder of a member of the Brown criminal organization. HSI will continue working with our law enforcement partners to investigate and, ultimately, dismantle criminal organizations that are wreaking violence in our communities through the illicit drug trade.”

Myrie was indicted along with five others in connection with a conspiracy to distribute marijuana as part of the Brown organization, a criminal organization whose members allegedly engaged in narcotics distribution primarily in Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Arizona, and Jamaica. The third superseding indictment was returned Oct. 25, 2011, and unsealed Nov. 7, 2011. Also charged in the indictment are:

  • Jean Brown, 42, of Jamaica;
  • Hubert Downer, aka Doc and Michael Reid, 51, of Jamaica;
  • Dmytro Holovko, aka The Russian, 53, of Hillside, N.J.;
  • Jason Carnegie, aka Dollar, Dollar Bill, and Dalski, 41, of Lauderhill, Fla. and
  • Anthony Hendrickson, 71, of Gardena, Calif.

The seven-count indictment alleges that from at least 2000 to the present, the defendants were part of the Brown drug organization and conspired to distribute and possess with intent to distribute at least 1,000 kilograms of marijuana. Further, the indictment alleges that in December 2009, Brown, Downer and Myrie kidnapped and murdered Michael Knight to further the Brown organization’s drug business. Downer is also charged with firearms violations and with illegally re-entering the United States, having previously been deported after a felony conviction.

The defendants face a maximum of life in prison for the drug conspiracy. Brown, Downer and Myrie face a maximum of life in prison for kidnapping in aid of racketeering and the death penalty for murder in aid of racketeering. Brown and Downer face a maximum of 10 years in prison for conspiracy to commit murder in aid or racketeering. Finally, Downer faces a maximum of 10 years in prison each for being a felon in possession of a firearm and for being an illegal alien in possession of a firearm, and 20 years in prison for illegal re-entry to the United States.

Myrie had his initial appearance in U.S. District Court in New York July 5 and will be transported to Baltimore in the next few weeks. Brown, Downer and Holovko are scheduled for trial Oct. 15. Hendrickson is scheduled for trial Feb. 4, 2013, and Carnegie previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute 100 kilograms or more of marijuana and is awaiting sentencing.

An indictment is not a finding of guilt. An individual charged by indictment is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at some later criminal proceedings.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Stefan D. Cassella and Peter M. Nothstein of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force.